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Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
Cover of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
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New York Times Bestseller The book that inspired the hit film! Sundance U.S. Dramatic Audience Award Sundance Grand Jury Prize This is the funniest book you'll ever read about death. It is a...
New York Times Bestseller The book that inspired the hit film! Sundance U.S. Dramatic Audience Award Sundance Grand Jury Prize This is the funniest book you'll ever read about death. It is a...
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Description-

  • New York Times Bestseller
    The book that inspired the hit film!


    Sundance U.S. Dramatic Audience Award
    Sundance Grand Jury Prize

    This is the funniest book you'll ever read about death.

    It is a universally acknowledged truth that high school sucks. But on the first day of his senior year, Greg Gaines thinks he's figured it out. The answer to the basic existential question: How is it possible to exist in a place that sucks so bad? His strategy: remain at the periphery at all times. Keep an insanely low profile. Make mediocre films with the one person who is even sort of his friend, Earl.
    This plan works for exactly eight hours. Then Greg's mom forces him to become friends with a girl who has cancer. This brings about the destruction of Greg's entire life.
    Praise for Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
    STARRED REVIEW
    "One need only look at the chapter titles ("Let's Just Get This Embarrassing Chapter Out of the Way") to know that this is one funny book."
    Booklist, starred review
    STARRED REVIEW
    "A frequently hysterical confessional...Debut novelist Andrews succeeds brilliantly in painting a portrait of a kid whose responses to emotional duress are entirely believable and sympathetic, however fiercely he professes his essential crappiness as a human being. Though this novel begs inevitable thematic comparisons to John Green's The Fault in Our Stars (2011), it stands on its own in inventiveness, humor and heart."
    Kirkus Reviews, starred review
    "It is sure to be popular with many boys, including reluctant readers, and will not require much selling on the part of the librarian."
    VOYA
    "Mr. Andrews' often hilarious teen dialogue is utterly convincing, and his characters are compelling. Greg's random sense of humor, terrible self-esteem and general lack of self-awareness all ring true. Like many YA authors, Mr. Andrews blends humor and pathos with true skill, but he steers clear of tricky resolutions and overt life lessons, favoring incremental understanding and growth."
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    Awards:
    Capitol Choices 2013 - Noteworthy Titles for Children and Teens
    Cooperative Children's Book Center (CCBC) Choices 2013 list - Young Adult Fiction
    YALSA 2013 Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers
    YALSA 2013 Best Fiction for Young Adults
    YALSA 2014 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults

About the Author-

  • Jesse Andrews is the New York Times bestselling author of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl and the screenwriter of that book's Sundance Grand Jury Prize–winning movie adaptation. He's also the author of The Haters, which Booklist called "effortlessly readable, deeply enjoyable," in a starred review. He lives in Brooklyn.

Reviews-

  • DOGO Books bookish5 - This was an extremely enjoyable book that took me only a day to finish. The main character is a guy named Greg who has spent his entire high school experience avoiding having friends or joining cliques. However, he does know Earl, who he's made films with ever since they met when they were kids. During Greg's senior year, he's informed by his mother that a girl that he's never really been friends with, Rachel, has been diagnosed with cancer, and- at least for a little while- he has to pretend to care about her. Greg wishes he cares- he really does- but there's a part of him, the real part, that knows the only reason he's pretending to is because of his Mom, and without her he wouldn't be going to Rachel's house nearly everyday, he wouldn't go to visit her in the hospital, he wouldn't make her laugh just to distract her from her disease, and he wouldn't make her a stupid film that only ended up showing the reality of the fact that he never really KNEW Rachel at all. So this, ultimately, ended up being the hilarious, real, gripping, happy, sad, and emotional story of Greg and Earl and the Dying Girl, and I couldn't have enjoyed it more.
  • Publisher's Weekly

    February 6, 2012
    In his debut novel, Andrews tackles some heavy subjects with irreverence and insouciance. Senior Greg Gaines has drifted through high school trying to be friendly with everyone but friends with no one, moving between cliques without committing. His only hobby is making awful movies with his foul-mouthed pal Earl. Greg’s carefully maintained routine is upset when his mother encourages him to spend time with Rachel, a classmate suffering from leukemia. Greg begrudgingly rekindles his friendship with Rachel, before being conned into making a movie about her. Narrated by Greg, who brings self-deprecation to new heights (or maybe depths), this tale tries a little too hard to be both funny and tragic, mixing crude humor and painful self-awareness. Readers may be either entertained or exhausted by the grab bag of narrative devices Andrews employs (screenplay-style passages, bulleted lists, movie reviews, fake newspaper headlines, outlines). In trying to defy the usual tearjerker tropes, Andrews ends up with an oddly unaffecting story. Ages 14–up. Agent: Matt Hudson, William Morris Endeavor.

  • Kirkus

    February 15, 2012
    A frequently hysterical confessional from a teen narrator who won't be able to convince readers he's as unlikable as he wants them to believe. "I have no idea how to write this stupid book," narrator Greg begins. Without answering the obvious question--just why is he writing" this stupid book"?--Greg lets readers in on plenty else. His filmmaking ambitions. His unlikely friendship with the unfortunately short, chain-smoking, foulmouthed, African-American Earl of the title. And his unlikelier friendship with Rachel, the titular "dying girl." Punctuating his aggressively self-hating account with film scripts and digressions, he chronicles his senior year, in which his mother guilt-trips him into hanging out with Rachel, who has acute myelogenous leukemia. Almost professionally socially awkward, Greg navigates his unwanted relationship with Rachel by showing her the films he's made with Earl, an oeuvre begun in fifth grade with their remake of Aguirre, Wrath of God. Greg's uber-snarky narration is self-conscious in the extreme, resulting in lines like, "This entire paragraph is a moron." Debut novelist Andrews succeeds brilliantly in painting a portrait of a kid whose responses to emotional duress are entirely believable and sympathetic, however fiercely he professes his essential crappiness as a human being. Though this novel begs inevitable thematic comparisons to John Green's The Fault in Our Stars (2011), it stands on its own in inventiveness, humor and heart. (Fiction. 14 & up)

    COPYRIGHT(2012) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • School Library Journal

    July 1, 2012

    Gr 9 Up-This debut novel is told from the point of view of intensely self-critical Greg S. Gaines, an aspiring filmmaker. A self-described pasty-faced failure with girls, the 17-year-old spends most of his time with his friend Earl, a foul-mouthed kid from the wrong side of town, watching classic movies and attempting to create their own cinematic masterpieces. When Greg's mother learns that Rachel, one of his classmates, has been diagnosed with leukemia, she encourages him to rekindle the friendship that started and ended in Hebrew school. While Greg promises that his story will contain "zero Important Life Lessons," his involvement with Rachel as her condition worsens nonetheless has an impact. In a moment of profundity, however, Greg also argues, "things are in no way more meaningful because I got to know Rachel before she died. If anything, things are less meaningful." Andrews makes use of a variety of narrative techniques to relate the story: scenes are presented in screenplay format and facts are related as numbered and elaborated-upon lists that are tied together by a first-person narrative divided into chapters indicated with self-deprecating titles (e.g., "I put the 'Ass' in 'Casanova'"). While the literary conceit-that the protagonist could be placed in a traditionally meaningful situation and not grow-is irreverent and introduced with a lot of smart-alecky humor, the length of the novel (overly long) and overuse of technique end up detracting from rather than adding to the story.-Amy S. Pattee, Simmons College, Boston

    Copyright 2012 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Booklist

    Starred review from March 1, 2012
    Grades 8-11 *Starred Review* Greg Gaines, 17, would be the first to tell you that his constant dickhead behavior makes him the least likely person to befriend a classmate dying of leukemia. But he is pushed into it by his mother and, well, the result is this horrifyingly inane, unstoppable barf-fest of a book. Greg prefers to keep a low profile at school, instead collaborating with his almost-gangsta pal, Earl, on terrible remakes of classic films: Apocalypse Later with Super Soakers, The Manchurian Cat-idate with cats. But his knack for cracking jokes keeps the dying girl, Rachel, smiling, and pretty soon the whole school thinks he is some kind of hero. He is even pushed into making a final opus: Rachel the Film, aka the worst film ever made. One need only look at the chapter titles ( Let's Just Get This Embarrassing Chapter Out of the Way ) to know that this is one funny book, highlighted by screenplay excerpts and Earl's pissy wisdom. What's crazy is how moving it becomes in spite of itself. The characters are neither smart or precocious. Greg is not suitably moved by Rachel's struggle. His film sucks. He thinks bereavement means being attacked by beavers. But it's this honest lack of profundity, and the struggle to overcome it, that makes Andrews' debut actually kinda profound.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2012, American Library Association.)

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