Hide Sora notification

Try Sora - the student reading app, by OverDrive

Apple App Store
Google Play Store
  Main Nav
Everything's Trash, But It's Okay
Cover of Everything's Trash, But It's Okay
Everything's Trash, But It's Okay
Borrow Borrow Borrow
Entertainment Weekly's Fall 2018's 25 Must-ReadsEssence's Fall 2018 Guide to All Things FunnyBustle's 18 New Nonfiction Books to Know in October"Robinson offers deft cultural criticism and hilarious...
Entertainment Weekly's Fall 2018's 25 Must-ReadsEssence's Fall 2018 Guide to All Things FunnyBustle's 18 New Nonfiction Books to Know in October"Robinson offers deft cultural criticism and hilarious...
Available Formats-
  • Kindle Book
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1

Recommended for you

 

Description-

  • Entertainment Weekly's Fall 2018's 25 Must-Reads
    Essence's Fall 2018 Guide to All Things Funny
    Bustle's 18 New Nonfiction Books to Know in October
    "Robinson offers deft cultural criticism and hilarious personal anecdotes that will make readers laugh, cringe, and cry. Everything may indeed be trash but writing like this reminds us that we're gonna make it through all the terrible things with honesty, laughter, and faith."
    —Roxane Gay, New York Times bestselling author

    New York Times bestselling author and star of 2 Dope Queens Phoebe Robinson is back with a new, hilarious, and timely essay collection on gender, race, dating, and the dumpster fire that is our world.
    Written in her trademark unfiltered and witty style, Robinson's latest collection is a call to arms. Outfitted with on-point pop culture references, these essays tackle a wide range of topics: giving feminism a tough-love talk on intersectionality, telling society's beauty standards to kick rocks, and calling foul on our culture's obsession with work. Robinson also gets personal, exploring money problems she's hidden from her parents, how dating is mainly a warmed-over bowl of hot mess, and definitely most important, meeting Bono not once, but twice. She's struggled with being a woman with a political mind and a woman with an ever-changing jeans size. She knows about trash because she sees it every day—and because she's seen roughly one hundred thousand hours of reality TV and zero hours of Schindler's List.
    With the intimate voice of a new best friend, Everything's Trash, But It's Okay is a candid perspective for a generation that has had the rug pulled out from under it too many times to count.

Excerpts-

  • From the book Introduction

    In summary: The world is currently one big "Previously on Homeland" recap that plays on repeat. Nothing but a bunch of dumpster fires and Claire Danes ugly‑cries.

    Despite a few glorious things—Beyoncé's historic Coachella performance and Solange's A Seat at the Table, Pamplemousse LaCroix, sitting in the window seat on a flight with an empty middle seat next to you—the world is en fuego, boo‑boos (and has been for a while, to be honest), and I have the receipts to prove it. I mean, Brexit happened. And some of the people who voted for it were like, "Oops, J/K," and the Legal System responded, "Lol. Wut? This is literally how voting works. The thing with the most votes wins. I don't have time for your #Jokes‑NotJokesButForRealWeHighKeyJokesLife, so please pack your bags." Then there was the De‑Peening of 2017 aka very powerful men such as award‑winning actor Kevin Spacey, legendary journalist Charlie Rose, comedian/auteur Louis C.K. watching their lives and careers implode following the uncovering of their sometimes decades‑long sexual‑deviant behavior, which ranged from harassment to sexual assault. And let's not forget the murder of Harambe, the gorilla, at the Cincinnati Zoo; Apple removing the headphone jack from their iPhones because this company is hell‑bent on being the Nurse Ratched of our time; or the first black bachelorette, Rachel Lindsay, incorrectly choosing Bryan over Peter, thus denying the world some cocoa, gap‑teefed babies. Oh! And remember a few years ago when a dude in the US legit had Ebola and went bowling and ate chicken wings with friends instead of quarantining himself because #WhiteNonsense? Say it with me: Dumpster. Fire. But far and away, the most telling sign that the world is in dire straits is the fact that in the past few years, the universe started killing off everyone who mattered in my childhood.

    There was Carrie Fisher (White Jesus, why?), Prince (Black Jesus, why?), George Michael (Levi Jeans Jesus, I can't), and David Bowie (Alien Jesus aka the feathers from Björk's swan dress at the 2001 Oscar ceremony, <squawk, blergh, blop>—because y'all know Björk and anything in Björk's universe only communicates through sound). Oof. I don't know about you, but I was overcome with emotion at seeing so many pop culture icons pass. Utterly devastated. Heartbroken and beside myself. So I mourned like we all did. Appropriately. Okay, I didn't, but I tried. Well, I tried the way I do when the heater in my apartment is too high and instead of getting up to adjust the thermostat, I say to no one, "It's too hot," and then unzip my onesie down to my hips so that I end up looking like a caterpillar taking a cigarette break mid‑metamorph‑morph aka metamorphosis. #IgnorantAbbrev #SorryForWastingYourTime. Anyhoo, I did not try very hard not to be utterly inappropriate mere days after Bowie's death.

    When he passed, I fell down the usual internet rabbit hole many of us are wont to do when someone famous dies. I read think pieces, bought any albums I didn't already own, watched old performances on YouTube. After about forty‑eight hours of this, I became an unofficial truther of Bowie's personal life, hoping that in my quest to unearth all the last unknown details about him, this busywork would distract me from the reality that we're all going to die. And since this mission was rooted in earnest and profound love for the dead, I felt like Doogie Howser at the end of Doogie Howser, M.D., just writing smart bon mots about what I'd learned. But I wasn't....

Reviews-

  • Kirkus

    September 1, 2018
    Current events and women's issues humorously tackled by a successful and prolific black woman comedian.In her follow-up to You Can't Touch My Hair,2 Dope Queens star Robinson brings back the unique brand of humor that made her debut book a bestseller. Here, the author explores common issues for women such as the yo-yo ride on the weight roller coaster, her own battle to accept her body image ("every day, I struggle not only with rewiring my brain to not equate self-worth with how my body looks, but also with not letting men and clothing companies define my own gaze"), and the idea of whether she has on "standing jeans or sitting jeans," the former of which she needs to undo in order to eat her meal. She writes about men's penis sizes, issues with her mother, the accumulation of debt, how meeting celebrities has affected her, and "being a trash person in a trash world"--to be fair, though, "no one on this planet can completely rid themselves of their trash ways." All of the essays are filled with hashtags, slang, unnecessary abbreviations, and constant references to current events and pop culture, so readers not familiar with the current trends may get lost from time to time. Although unquestionably a humor book--and much of it is quite funny--the author isn't afraid to confront serious issues, including violence against blacks, women, and Muslims; the difficulty of being a woman sports fan; and how topics such as abortion rights are constantly under attack by the white men in power in this country. Throughout, it's clear that Robinson has a specific brand of humor that won't resonate with everyone. Readers who enjoy her podcast and loved her first book will find even more to appreciate here; others should look elsewhere for a good laugh.A mixed bag, much like many essay collections from pop-culture figures.

    COPYRIGHT(2018) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • Library Journal

    October 15, 2018

    In her second book, Robinson (Two Dope Queens podcast; You Can't Touch My Hair) takes on topics such as interracial dating and issues of race still inherent within modern feminism. In more lighthearted prose, the author also describes meeting heroes such as Oprah and Bono and spending a day with Julia Roberts and her family on their yacht. Throughout, Robinson maintains her etymological quirks and humorous abbreviations as well as an unapologetic directness in her opinions peppered with wit and a unique gift for mixing erudite commentary with pop-culture observations, resulting in highly entertaining word pictures. VERDICT Robinson's collection will appeal to fans of her previous work as well as those who enjoy sociopolitical essays sprinkled with a generous dash of humor.--Stacy Shaw, Denver

    Copyright 2018 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Publisher's Weekly

    October 22, 2018
    Comedian Robinson (You Can’t Touch My Hair) spins stories that are laugh-out-loud funny yet carry an unmistakable undertone of seriousness regarding sexism and race relations. As a woman of color in stand-up comedy—often the arena of white men—Robinson has faced harassment (including fellow comedians catcalling her on and off the stage), and her anger fuels bold proclamations that should inspire women to push back against sexism and discrimination (“Women have to stop apologizing for things they don’t need to apologize for”). She is especially on point when discussing the highs and lows of race relations, believing that America had changed for the better in 2008 (“It felt like a new era, and anything was possible because there was proof of it every day in the Oval Office”) and then for the worse in 2016 (“We have a president... who behaves as though all African-Americans live in the inner city”). The author also touches on lighter topics as well, such as Oprah’s endorsement of Robinson’s first book (“Queen O continued with her message, and it was beyond lovely”), the difficulties of modern dating, and even the importance of good skin care. Robinson’s side-splitting memoir will both entertain and empower her readers.

  • Booklist

    September 15, 2018
    To quote Robinson herself from this collection's essay about workaholism, "Why publish one book in the span of two years when I could pub two?" And in those two years since releasing her instantly best-selling first book, You Can't Touch My Hair (2016), writer, actor, and podcast host Robinson has been busy. She made her feature-film debut in Ibiza; freed herself from student-loan and credit-card debt; came to terms with that previously mentioned workaholism; hung out with her idol, Bono, multiple times; and even fell in love (not with Bono!). As in her first book, Robinson maintains a baseline of free-associating, footnoting, list-making hilarity, which both disarms and readies readers for the tougher truths she tackles. Particularly poignant are her essays about money?a very open piece that will speak directly to those working in creative fields and millennials, who, like Robinson, graduated into the Great Recession?and about feminism: her frustrations with its lack of inclusivity and her demands for it to be and do better for women of color, queer women, and all women.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2018, American Library Association.)

Title Information+

  • Publisher
    Penguin Publishing Group
  • Kindle Book
    Release date:
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • EPUB eBook
    Release date:

Digital Rights Information+

  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You have reached the maximum number of titles you are allowed to recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 4 titles every 1 days.

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend this title for your digital library.

Close

Enhanced Details:

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

MP3 audiobooks are only supported on macOS 10.6 (Snow Leopard) through 10.14 (Mojave). Learn more about MP3 audiobook support on Macs.

Close

Please update to the latest version of the OverDrive app to stream videos.

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Recommend this title for your digital library
Everything's Trash, But It's Okay
Everything's Trash, But It's Okay
Phoebe Robinson
Optional:
Close
Buy it now
and support our digital library!
Everything's Trash, But It's Okay
Everything's Trash, But It's Okay
Phoebe Robinson
A portion of your purchase goes to support your digital library.
Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel

Sora Turbo
Get the app!
Apple App Store
Google Play Store
Brought to you by Barrington High School, and built with 💕 by OverDrive.
Close

Renewing this title won't extend your lending period. Instead, it will let you borrow the title again immediately after your first lending period expires.

Close

You can't renew this title because there are holds on it. However, you can join the holds list and be notified when it becomes available for you to borrow again.

Close