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Eyes of the Emperor
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Eyes of the Emperor
Prisoners of the Empire Series, Book 2
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Eddy Okubo lies about his age and joins the army in his hometown of Honolulu only weeks before the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor. Suddenly Americans see him as the enemy—even the U.S. Army doubts...
Eddy Okubo lies about his age and joins the army in his hometown of Honolulu only weeks before the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor. Suddenly Americans see him as the enemy—even the U.S. Army doubts...
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  • Eddy Okubo lies about his age and joins the army in his hometown of Honolulu only weeks before the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor. Suddenly Americans see him as the enemy—even the U.S. Army doubts the loyalty of Japanese American soldiers.
    Then the army sends Eddy and a small band of Japanese American soldiers on a secret mission to a small island off the coast of Mississippi. Here they are given a special job, one that only they can do. Eddy’s going to help train attack dogs. He’s going to be the bait.
 

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Excerpts-

  • From the book 1Honolulu,August 1941The Spirit of JapanI'd be lying if I said I wasn't afraid."Bad, bad times," Pop mumbled just yesterday, scowling to himself in the boatyard while reading the Japanese newspaper, Hawaii Hochi. He mashed his lips together and tossed the paper into the trash.  I pulled it out when he wasn't looking. Some haole businessmen were saying all Japanese in Hawaii should be confined to the island of Molokai. Those white guys thought there were too many of us now; we were becoming too powerful. The tension outside Japanese camp in Honolulu was so tight you could almost hear it snapping in the air.And to make things worse, Japan, Pop's homeland, was stirring up big trouble.In 1931, when I was six, the Japanese invaded Manchuria, and they had been pushing deeper into China ever since. Less than a year ago, they'd signed up with Germany and Italy to form the Axis, all of them looking for more land, more power. Then, just last month, Japan flooded into Cambodia and Thailand.And my homeland, the U.S.A., was getting angry.President Roosevelt was negotiating with Japan to stop its invasions and get out of China, but nothing seemed to be working.And for every American of Japanese ancestry, Pop was right—these were bad, bad times.That summer I'd just turned sixteen. Me and my younger brother, Herbie, who was thirteen, helped Pop build boats in his boatyard, a business he'd had since he and Ma came to Hawaii from Hiroshima in 1921. Pop had been making sampan-style fishing boats all his life. He had a skilled apprentice named Bunichi, fresh off the boat from Japan by two years. With all of us helping out, Pop's business managed to survive.We were finishing up a new forty-footer for a haole from Kaneohe, the first boat Pop had ever made for a white guy. And there would be more, because Pop's reputation had grown beyond Japanese camp. Without question, there was no better boatbuilder in these islands than Koji Okubo, my pop. We'd been working on this one for more than seven months now, ten hours a day, six days a week.  I was painting the hull bright white over primed wood soaked in boiled linseed oil. I had to strain the paint through fine netting so it would go on like silk, leaving no room for the smallest mistake. Pop lived in the Japanese way of dame oshi, which meant everything had to be perfect.The paint fumes were getting to me, so I climbed down off the ladder to go out back for some fresh air. A small, flea-infested mutt got up and followed me into the sun. I'd found him a couple of months ago licking oil off old engine parts in the boatyard, and I'd given him some of my lunch. Now that ratty dog stuck to me like glue. I called him Sharky because he growled and showed teeth to everyone but me. Pop didn't like him, but he let him live at the shop to chase away nighttime prowlers.Pop's shop was right on the water, and just as I walked outside, a Japanese destroyer was heading out of Honolulu Harbor, passing by so close I could hit it with a slingshot. A long line of motionless and orderly guys in white uniforms stood on deck gazing back at the island. I squinted, studying them as Sharky settled by my feet. Pop suddenly ghosted up next to me, wiping his hands on a paint rag. I could see him in the corner of my eye. He was forty-eight years old and starting to get a bouncy stomach. A couple inches shorter than me, about five three. His undershirt was white and clean, tucked into khaki pants that hung on him like drying laundry, bunched at his waist with a piece of rope. He had short gray hair that prickled up on his tan head. As usual, he was scowling.Sharky got up and moved away. Pop pointed his chin toward the destroyer. "That's something,...

About the Author-

  • Graham Salisbury is the author of several novels. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

Reviews-

  • Publisher's Weekly

    Starred review from September 5, 2005
    In the fall of 1941, Eddy Okubo, 16, alters his birth certificate to enlist in the U.S. Army, serving alongside his older "dock dog" buddies who are completing boot camp in their native Hawaii. Eddy's father, a boat builder of Japanese descent, is initially aghast, but after the "cowardly and shameful" sneak attack on the U.S. fleet in Pearl Harbor, realizes his son has acted honorably. Eddy has second thoughts when he and his mates report for duty and find themselves under suspicion—indeed even under armed watch at times—solely because of their ancestry. Asked repeatedly to prove themselves, Eddy's unit members do their job and maintain their dignity until one assignment rattles the men's resolve. Based on a real experiment that took place on an island off Mississippi, Eddy and other Japanese-American soldiers are used as "bait" for dogs the Army is training to hunt and kill enemies in the Pacific. (In an author's note, Salisbury reports interviewing eight of the 26 actual participants.) The novel brims with memorable and haunting scenes—the chaos that ensues in Honolulu after the bombing, the Japanese sailor who is so disgraced after his capture that he asks to be shot, the dog training which involved laying horsemeat on the soldiers' necks to teach the dogs to go for the kill. A companion novel to Salisbury's Under the Blood-Red Sun
    , this is a valuable and gripping addition to the canon of WW II historical fiction from a perspective young readers rarely see. Ages 12-up.

  • School Library Journal

    September 1, 2005
    Gr 8 Up -Salisbury continues to make his mark by bringing alive the time in Hawaii when the U.S. entered World War II. Eddy, a 16-year-old Japanese American, tells how he and his buddies, Chik and Cobra, become part of Company B of the 100th Infantry Battalion following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Without discounting the community's old loyalties to Japan, the story makes clear the transition caused by the declaration of war, and by the desire to be part of the great fight to protect America. These young men are patriotic, but the powers that be have a hard time trusting their dedication. The novel is based on historical fact, and Salisbury brings events vividly to life as he recounts one humiliation after another foisted on the troops, from the top down to their immediate commanders. In one scene, these soldiers are heading to training camps on trains that pass internment camps for other Japanese Americans. As the actual assignment unfolds -they are to act as bait in the training of attack dogs -the pernicious racism and absurd beliefs are further revealed. The immediacy of the writing allows readers to imagine themselves as one of the boys. A story with huge implications for observers of current events." -Carol A. Edwards, Douglas County Libraries, Castle Rock, CO"

    Copyright 2005 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

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Prisoners of the Empire Series, Book 2
Graham Salisbury
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