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Girl Rising
Cover of Girl Rising
Girl Rising
Changing the World One Girl at a Time
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A gorgeous, full-color oversized book about educating girls across the world inspired by the documentary that Entertainment Weekly says “every mother, sister, daughter, should see, as well as the...
A gorgeous, full-color oversized book about educating girls across the world inspired by the documentary that Entertainment Weekly says “every mother, sister, daughter, should see, as well as the...
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Description-

  • A gorgeous, full-color oversized book about educating girls across the world inspired by the documentary that Entertainment Weekly says “every mother, sister, daughter, should see, as well as the men who love and support them.” This is the right book for the present moment and perfect for fans of inspirational nonfiction such as I Am Malala and anyone who believes that one girl can change the world.

    Worldwide, over 130 million girls are not in school.
    But one girl with courage is a revolution

    Girl Rising, a global campaign for girls’ education, created a film that chronicled the stories of nine girls in the developing world, allowing viewers the opportunity to witness how education can break the cycle of poverty.

    Now, award-winning author Tanya Lee Stone deftly uses new research to illuminate the dramatic facts behind the film, focusing both on the girls captured on camera and many...

Excerpts-

  • From the book It is easy to notice only our own place in the world—what's right in front of us, and around us, and has been since the second we became conscious beings. When we are babies, our limited view of the world focuses on the people in our immediate family. Soon we notice our home, our neighborhood, our town. As we grow, we begin to see a wider picture of the world and the people with whom we share it. After all, there are more than seven billion other people on earth.
    What happens to all those other people affects what happens to us, whether or not we know it, or choose to pay attention. Money, war, natural disasters, literacy, education—these are all factors that have wide-sweeping influences that connect us to each other, whether we live in a small town in Iowa or a village in Sierra Leone or a city in Thailand. What happens to our fellow citizens on earth shapes all of us.
    This may sound simple, but it's an important place to start when we think about the ways in which the world could change to make it a more balanced, more humane, more functional place. When it comes to education, one fact affects us all: worldwide, over 62 million girls are not in school. Why is this, and why is it so important?
    By now, you have probably heard the story of Malala Yousafzai, who spoke out publicly against the Taliban (a fundamentalist Islamic group) for destroying girls' schools in her native Pakistan. She was just ten years old. The following year, she wrote blog posts for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) about girls' right to education. At first, she used a fake name because it was dangerous to speak out publicly. But even after her identity was revealed, she continued her work and was acknowledged for it, winning Pakistan's National Youth Peace Prize in 2011.
    Her bold actions put her life at risk. In October 2012, when she was fifteen, a young Taliban man boarded her school bus and shot her point-blank in the head. Somehow Malala survived that gunshot. She continued to speak out, undaunted. In 2014, Malala became the youngest person to win a Nobel Peace Prize.
    As phenomenal as Malala is, she would likely be the first to agree that she is not alone on her mission. Around the globe, girls are fighting for a better life: escaping forced labor, refusing to be married too young, sacrificing their safety to change long-held traditions. They are fighting to become educated and make the world a better place in the process. As former British prime minister Gordon Brown wrote, "There are a million young Malalas."
    You may think you have nothing in common with many of these girls—that they lead lives that are completely different from yours, that they are "other" kinds of girls who live in "other" kinds of places. That is not true.
    Girls are girls, no matter where they live. These are girls with sisters, brothers, cousins, aunts, uncles, mothers, fathers. Girls with best friends, sharing secrets. Girls playing their favorite music, swimming, jumping, playing, dreaming, working.
    One thing about their lives is dramatically different, though: the opportunity to go to school and get an education is not something they can count on. It is something they must fight for.
    Most young people in developed nations (nations with a high level of industry and standard of living—for example, Great Britain, America, and most of Europe)— get up in the morning and head to school without a second thought, because free public education is available to all. But in more than fifty countries, school is not free, and often, students and their families cannot pay.
    We look at numbers and facts all the time without necessarily understanding...

About the Author-

  • Tanya Lee Stone has received many awards and honors for her books, including an NAACP Image Award for Courage Has No Color, a Robert F. Sibert Medal for Almost Astronauts, and a Golden Kite Award for The Good, the Bad, and the Barbie. Her articles and reviews have appeared in School Library Journal, the Horn Book Magazine, and the New York Times. She is best known for her passion for telling little-known or unknown true stories of people who have been missing from our histories. Stone went to Oberlin College and now teaches writing at Champlain College. You can find her online at tanyastone.com, on facebook.com/tanyastone, and on Twitter at @TanyaLeeStone.

Reviews-

  • Publisher's Weekly

    January 2, 2017
    Stone (Courage Has No Color) delivers a frank, hard-hitting exploration of why some 62 million girls worldwide don’t attend school, collaborating with the team behind the 2013 documentary Girl Rising, which spurred a global campaign devoted to creating educational opportunities for girls. As Stone discusses modern-day child slavery, child marriage, gender bias, and lack of access to schooling, profiles and photographs of the girls featured in the Girl Rising film mix with the stories of other girls from Cambodia, Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, and elsewhere. The result is a vivid, heartrending portrait of resilience in the face of tremendous obstacles; a closing section details ways readers can take action. Ages 14–up. Agent: (for Stone), Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio; (for Girl Rising), Scott Waxman, Waxman Leavell Literary.

  • Kirkus

    Starred review from December 1, 2016
    Although unfortunate circumstances in developing countries prevent girls from getting educations, nevertheless they remain resilient. Sibert Medalist Stone begins by explaining how the documentary Girl Rising inspired a book that further amplifies and explores the heartbreaking and inspiring stories of girls around the globe who are advocating for access to and freedom of education. Collected from over 45 hours of raw video interview footage, direct quotes from women and girls unveil a distressing web of hardships for girls as young as 5 and the unjust factors that prevent them from bettering their lives: poverty, human trafficking, modern-day slavery, child marriage, and, perhaps the most prevalent, gender discrimination. Around the world, the book zooms in on the struggles of girls from Afghanistan, Cambodia, Egypt, Ethiopia, Haiti, India, Nepal, Peru, Sierra Leone, among other countries. Both portraits and documentary-style photographs are numerous, and infographic designs will appeal to younger readers. Stone's passionate, deliberate, and compelling narrative explores the culture of gender discrimination and induces a sense of urgency for a solution. The recounted interviews offer insight, candor, and emotion, sparing readers little.A moving account of hardships and triumphs that is bound to inspire future activists, this is a devastating but crucial read. (author's note, appendix, bibliography, source notes) (Nonfiction. 14 & up)

    COPYRIGHT(2016) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • School Library Journal

    December 1, 2016

    Gr 8 Up-This visually stunning companion piece to the 2013 film of the same name seeks to explain why 62 million girls worldwide do not go to school. Taking from the film the stories of nine girls who overcame the odds against them to achieve at least some degree of education, the book provides a more in-depth explanation of the barriers girls face and also many accounts that were not included in the final cut. This volume is also a call to arms, detailing not just why girls are prevented from going to school but also why it is critically important to their countries and the global economy that they be allowed to do so. The tone is persuasive, and a concluding section spotlights a number of activist success stories while also laying out ways in which readers can help. The appeal is primarily to the heartstrings. Much of the information is anecdotal, and gorgeous color photographs of the girls radiating determination and hope dominate almost every spread. Impressive back matter adds further heft, including an informative author's note explaining how Stone verified and supplemented the research of the film crews, an extensive bibliography, and complete source notes. Unfortunately, an oversimplification that implies global poverty stems from overpopulation ("There are more than twenty million victims of slavery today... Why? For one thing, there are more of us living on the planet than ever before") mars what is otherwise an exceptionally strong package. VERDICT This well-organized emotional plea would be a welcome addition in high schools with a community service or human rights focus.-Eileen Makoff, P.S. 90 Edna Cohen School, Brooklyn

    Copyright 2016 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • Booklist

    Starred review from February 1, 2017
    Grades 9-12 *Starred Review* Much more than a companion volume to the 2013 semidocumentary of the same title, which portrayed nine girls around the globe overcoming daunting barriers to obtain an education, this vibrant book stands on its own as a source of inspiration. Going into greater detail than is possible in a cinematic format, the author tells the girls' backstories with empathy and grace; she also provides heartening updates and illuminates the context of the struggle. In 50 countries, education is not free, and in many of these, education for girls is viewed as, at best, inessential, at worst, anathema60 million girls receive limited or no schooling. Instead, they are required to work: in some of the cases described here, they're sold very young by their families as virtual slaves (restaveks in Haiti, kamlari in Nepal). Child marriage14 million cases yearly worldwiderepresents essentially the same script. The closing chapter is a call to activism, and close-up full-color photos of the girls profiled will let young readers connect even more. Some of the stories contained here are perhaps too strong for younger readers, although it was a seven-year-old girl in Toronto who came up with the notion of Pencil Mountain, which ships school supplies to Ethiopia. Readers may be moved to initiate projects of their own.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2017, American Library Association.)

  • Kirkus, starred review "A moving account of hardships and triumphs that is bound to inspire future activists, this is a devastating but crucial read. "
  • Booklist, starred review "Much more than a companion volume to the 2013 semidocumentary of the same title... this vibrant book stands on its own as a source of inspiration."

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    Random House Children's Books
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